Monday, 31 July 2017

City of Bath

The city of Bath looks very beautiful with a lot of interesting buildings but I think the main attraction is really the Roman baths

Bath
This postcard was sent by Lucy

Bath is the largest city in the ceremonial county of Somerset, England, known for its Roman-built baths.
There are many Roman archaeological sites throughout the central area of the city. The baths themselves are about 6 metres (20 ft) below the present city street level. Around the hot springs, Roman foundations, pillar bases, and baths can still be seen, however all the stonework above the level of the baths is from more recent periods.
Bath Abbey was a Norman church built on earlier foundations. The present building dates from the early 16th century and shows a late Perpendicular style with flying buttresses and crocketed pinnacles decorating a crenellated and pierced parapet. - in: wikipedia

Roman Baths
This postcard was sent by Miguel

The Roman Baths complex is a site of historical interest in the English city of Bath. The house is a well-preserved Roman site for public bathing.
The Roman Baths themselves are below the modern street level. There are four main features: the Sacred Spring, the Roman Temple, the Roman Bath House and the Museum, holding finds from Roman Bath. The buildings above street level date from the 19th century.
The first shrine at the site of the hot springs was built by Celts, and was dedicated to the goddess Sulis, whom the Romans identified with Minerva.
The name Sulis continued to be used after the Roman invasion, leading to the town's Roman name of Aquae Sulis ("the waters of Sulis"). The temple was constructed in 60-70 AD and the bathing complex was gradually built up over the next 300 years. During the Roman occupation of Britain, and possibly on the instructions of Emperor Claudius, engineers drove oak piles to provide a stable foundation into the mud and surrounded the spring with an irregular stone chamber lined with lead. In the 2nd century it was enclosed within a wooden barrel-vaulted building, and included the caldarium (hot bath), tepidarium (warm bath), and frigidarium (cold bath). - in: wikipedia

Tuesday, 25 July 2017

Tarnowskie Góry Lead-Silver-Zinc Mine and its Underground Water Management System

This was the first site I received of the sites inscribed this year

Tarnowskie Góry Mine
This postcard was sent by Boguslaw

Located in Upper Silesia, in southern Poland, one of the main mining areas of central Europe, the site includes the entire underground mine with adits, shafts, galleries and water management system. Most of the site is situated underground while the surface mining topography features the remains of the 19th century steam water pumping station, which testifies to continuous efforts over three centuries to drain the underground extraction zone. It has made it possible to use undesirable water from the mines to supply towns and industry. Tarnowskie Góry represents a significant contribution to the global production of lead and zinc. - in: http://whc.unesco.org/en/list/1539

Monday, 24 July 2017

Wieliczka and Bochnia Royal Salt Mines

These two mines include some amazing galleries turned into chapels, workshops, storehouses, etc. Statues and decorative elements sculpted into the rock salt can also be found in both mines

Wieliczka Salt Mine
 This postcard was sent by Miguel

The Wieliczka Salt Mine (PolishKopalnia soli Wieliczka), located in the town of Wieliczka in southern Poland, lies within the Krakówmetropolitan area. Opened in the 13th century, the mine produced table salt continuously until 2007, as one of the world's oldest salt mines in operation.
The mine is currently one of Poland's official national Historic Monuments (Pomniki historii), whose attractions include dozens of statues and four chapels carved out of the rock saltby the miners, as well as supplemental carvings made by contemporary artists. - in: wikipedia


Bochnia Salt Mine
This postcard was sent by Boguslaw

The beginnings of the Bochnia mine as an excavating plant date back to 1248. Being a royal facility, the mine generated a huge income.
The Bochnia Salt Mine is the greatest treasure of the Bochnia region. Thanks to the salt deposits, the town of Bochnia became one of the most important economic centres of Medieval Małopolska. With each passing century, the Salt Mine continued to leave a distinct mark on the history of the city, its urban development but also the history of business initiatives, and industrial and social development. It is here, in the Bochnia mines, that the process of innovating salt excavation methods gave rise to the introduction of then novel technical solutions.  - in: http://bochnia-mine.eu/okopalni/historia/

Friday, 21 July 2017

From the Great Saltworks of Salins-les-Bains to the Royal Saltworks of Arc-et-Senans, the Production of Open-pan Salt

I could have visited Arc-et-Senans when I was in Besançon, but my wife is not as enthusiastic for UNESCO sites as I am and she convinced me to leave it for the next time... I don't have any card of Salins-les-Bains, maybe a good excuse to visit both :)

Royal Saltworks of Arc-et-Senans
This postcard was sent by Christine

The Saline Royale (Royal Saltworks) is a historical building at Arc-et-Senans in the department of Doubs, eastern France. It is next to the Forest of Chaux and about 35 kilometers from Besançon. The architect was Claude-Nicolas Ledoux (1736–1806), a prominent Parisian architect of the time. The work is an important example of an early Enlightenment project in which the architect based his design on a philosophy that favored arranging buildings according to a rational geometry and a hierarchical relation between the parts of the project. - in: wikipedia

Cistercian Abbey of Fontenay

The Abbey of Fontenay forms a connecting link between Romanesque and Gothic architectures.

Cistercian Abbey of Fontenay


The Abbey of Fontenay is a former Cistercian abbey located in the commune of Marmagne, near Montbard, in the département of Côte-d'Or in France. It was founded by Saint Bernard of Clairvaux in 1118, and built in the Romanesque style. It is one of the oldest and most complete Cistercian abbeys in Europe, and became a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1981. Of the original complex comprising church, dormitorycloisterchapter housecaldariumrefectorydovecote and forge, all remain intact except the refectory and are well maintained. - in: wikipedia

Wednesday, 19 July 2017

The Loire Valley between Sully-sur-Loire and Chalonnes

So far I only have postcards of three of the many outstanding castles along the Loire Valley. I hope to get more and maybe one day I'll visit some of them

Château de Cheverny
This postcard was sent by Nadia


The castle of Cheverny, is located between Blois and Chambord and a few kilometres below Cheverny village, and is one of the best preserved castles in all of France - and well worth visiting to admire the highly original works of antique kept there and for its architecture, in both classical and Renaissance styles.
The castle of Cheverny, begun around 1500, was concluded in a few years between 1604 and about 1634 by the Hurault Family and it welcomes visitors with a road 6 kilometres long, wide and lush gardens and a stream. It has a rectangular base, at the corners of which stand four pavilions, and, apparently, the overall design of the building was the work of Jacques Bougier (the architect of Blois) and Jean Mosnier (1600-1656), who respectively headed the construction and decoration of the castle. - in: http://www.loirevalleyfrance.net/castles/chateau-cheverny.html


Château de Chenonceau
This postcard was sent by Marion

The Château de Chenonceau is a French château spanning the River Cher, near the small village of Chenonceaux in the Indre-et-Loire département of the Loire Valley in France. It is one of the best-known châteaux of the Loire valley.
The estate of Chenonceau is first mentioned in writing in the 11th century. The current château was built in 1514–1522 on the foundations of an old mill and was later extended to span the river. The bridge over the river was built (1556-1559) to designs by the French Renaissance architect Philibert de l'Orme, and the gallery on the bridge (1570–1576) to designs by Jean Bullant. - in: wikipedia

Château de Chambord
This postcard was sent from The Netherlands by Gerry

The Château de Chambord at Chambord, Loir-et-Cher, France, is one of the most recognisable châteaux in the world because of its very distinctive French Renaissance architecture which blends traditional French medieval forms with classical Renaissance structures. The building, which was never completed, was constructed by King Francis I of France.
Chambord is the largest château in the Loire Valley; it was built to serve as a hunting lodge for Francis I, who maintained his royal residences at the châteaux of Blois and Amboise.
Chambord was altered considerably during the twenty-eight years of its construction (1519–1547), during which it was overseen on-site by Pierre Nepveu. With the château nearing completion, Francis showed off his enormous symbol of wealth and power by hosting his old archrival, Emperor Charles V, at Chambord. - in: wikipedia

Tuesday, 18 July 2017

Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park

Uluru is one of Australia's most recognizable natural landmarks. There are a lot of legends and myths about Uluru, but also about Kata Tjuta.

Uluru/Ayers Rock
This postcard was sent by Penny

Uluru, also known as Ayers Rock and officially gazetted as "Uluru / Ayers Rock", is a large sandstone rock formation in the southern part of the Northern Territory in central Australia. It lies 335 km (208 mi) south west of the nearest large town, Alice Springs, 450 km (280 mi) by road.
Kata Tjuta and Uluru are the two major features of the Uluṟu-Kata Tjuṯa National Park. Uluru is sacred to the Pitjantjatjara Anangu, the Aboriginal people of the area. The area around the formation is home to an abundance of springs, waterholes, rock caves and ancient paintings. - in: wikipedia


Uluru and Kata Tjuta
This postcard was sent by Steph


Kata Tjuṯa, (PitjantjatjaraKata Tjuṯa, lit. 'many heads'), also known as the Olgas, is a group of large, domed rock formations or bornhardts located about 365 km (227 mi) southwest of Alice Springs, in the southern part of the Northern Territory, central Australia.
The 36 domes that make up Kata Tjuṯa cover an area of 21.68 km2 (8.37 sq mi), are composed of conglomerate, a sedimentary rock consisting of cobbles and boulders of varying rock types including granite and basalt, cemented by a matrix of sandstone. The highest dome, Mount Olga, is 1,066 m (3,497 ft) above sea level, or approximately 546 m (1,791 ft) above the surrounding plain (198 m (650 ft) higher than Uluru). in: wikipedia

Monday, 17 July 2017

Gelati Monastery

When this site was inscribed in the UNESCO World Heritage list, it comprised the Bagrati Cathedral and the Gelati Monastery. Unfortunately, this year the Bagrati Cathedral was removed from the list.

Gelati Monastery
This postcard was sent from Finland by Sini

Gelati is a medieval monastic complex near Kutaisi, in the Imereti region of western Georgia. A masterpiece of the Georgian Golden Age, Gelati was founded in 1106 by King David IV of Georgia.
The Gelati Monastery has preserved a great number of murals and manuscripts dating back to the 12th to 17th centuries. The Khakhuli triptych was enshrined at Gelati until being stolen in 1859. Gelati is the burial site of its founder and one of the greatest Georgian kings David IV. Near King David's grave are the gates of Ganja, which were taken as a trophy by King Demetrius I of Georgia in 1138. - in: wikiedia

Saturday, 15 July 2017

Petäjävesi Old Church

This church remained abandoned for a long time, until an Austrian art historian noticed its architectural and historical value.

Petäjävesi Old Church
This postcard was sent by Anja

Built for a small Lutheran parish in central Finland, Petäjävesi Old Church is located on a peninsula at Lake Solikkojärvi and is surrounded by an agricultural landscape with lakes and forests, typical of the region.
Construction of this wooden church was led by a local master builder, Jaakko Leppänen. The bell tower was added to the western part of the church in 1821 by the master’s grandson, Erkki Leppänen.

Petäjävesi Old Church
This postcard was sent by Tarja

The layout and interior of the church, with intricate perspectives, vaulting and a central cupola, combines the influences of Renaissance, Baroque and Gothic styles with the Finnish vernacular tradition of log construction. The steepness of the pitched roof recalls the Gothic tradition. The interior’s hand-carved log surfaces with their silky patina and the silvery sheen on the seasoned walls lend the hall its unique atmosphere, which is further enhanced by the slightly irregular placement of the floor beams and pews. The distinctive features of the interior are the elaborately carved pulpit, pews, chandeliers, and galleries with balustrades, which are entirely the work of local craftsmen and artists. - in: http://whc.unesco.org/en/list/584

Monday, 10 July 2017

Old Bridge Area of the Old City of Mostar

Mostar is known for the jumps from the bridge to the water. I would love to visit this city but I definitely don't want to jump

Mostar
This postcard arrived from Czech Republic sent by Veronika

Mostar is a city and municipality in southern Bosnia and Herzegovina. Inhabited by 105,797 people, it is the most important city in the Herzegovina region, its cultural capital, and the center of the Herzegovina-Neretva Canton of the Federation. Mostar is situated on the Neretva River and is the fifth-largest city in the country. 

Mostar
This postcard, unfortunately repeated, was sent from Germany by Thomas

Mostar was named after the bridge keepers (mostari) who in the medieval times guarded the Stari Most (Old Bridge) over the Neretva. The Old Bridge, built by the Ottomans in the 16th century, is one of Bosnia and Herzegovina's most recognizable landmarks, and is considered one of the most exemplary pieces of Islamic architecture in the Balkans. - in: wikipedia

Old Bridge of Mostar
This postcard was sent by Stasa

Stari Most (English: Old Bridge) is a 16th-century Ottoman bridge in the city of Mostar in Bosnia and Herzegovina that crosses the river Neretva and connects the two parts of the city. The Old Bridge stood for 427 years, until it was destroyed on 9 November 1993 by Croat forces during the Croat–Bosniak War. Subsequently, a project was set in motion to reconstruct it, and the rebuilt bridge opened on 23 July 2004. - in: wikipedia

Neolithic Flint Mines at Spiennes (Mons)

The Neolithic flint mines of Spiennes are among the largest and earliest Neolithic flint mines in Europe

Neolithic Flint Mines at Spiennes
This postcard was sent by Gerda

The Neolithic flint mines at Spiennes, covering more than 100 ha, are the largest and earliest concentration of ancient mines in Europe. They are also remarkable for the diversity of technological solutions used for extraction and for the fact that they are directly linked to a settlement of the same period. - in: http://whc.unesco.org/en/list/1006

Chhatrapati Shivaji Terminus (formerly Victoria Terminus)

This must be one of the most beautiful railway stations in the world!

Chhatrapati Shivaji Terminus
This  postcard was sent ba Prashanth

The Chhatrapati Shivaji Terminus, formerly known as Victoria Terminus Station, in Mumbai, is an outstanding example of Victorian Gothic Revival architecture in India, blended with themes deriving from Indian traditional architecture. The building, designed by the British architect F. W. Stevens, became the symbol of Bombay as the ‘Gothic City’ and the major international mercantile port of India. The terminal was built over 10 years, starting in 1878, according to a High Victorian Gothic design based on late medieval Italian models. Its remarkable stone dome, turrets, pointed arches and eccentric ground plan are close to traditional Indian palace architecture. It is an outstanding example of the meeting of two cultures, as British architects worked with Indian craftsmen to include Indian architectural tradition and idioms thus forging a new style unique to Bombay. - in: http://whc.unesco.org/en/list/945

Rani-ki-Vav (the Queen’s Stepwell) at Patan, Gujarat

This looks like a palace but it's a stepwell with an amazing and well preserved sculptural decoration

Ran-ki-Vav
This postcard was sent by Nagi

Rani ki vav, or Ran-ki vav (Queen’s step well) was constructed during the rule of the Chaulukya dynasty. It is generally assumed that it was built in the memory of Bhima I (r. c. 1022–1064) by his widowed queen Udayamati and probably completed by Udayamati and Karna after his death. A reference to Udayamati building the monument is in Prabandha Chintamani, composed by the Jain monk Merunga Suri in 1304 AD.
The stepwell was later flooded by the nearby Saraswati River and silted over until the late 1980s. When it was excavated by the Archaeological Survey of India, the carvings were found in pristine condition. - in: wikipedia

Friday, 7 July 2017

Hill Forts of Rajasthan

This site includes six majestic forts that use the natural defenses offered by the landscape

Gagron Fort
This postcard was sent by Prashanth

Gagron Fort is situated in Jhalawar district of Rajasthan, in the Hadoti region of India. It is an example of a hill and water fort. - in: wikipedia

Amber Fort
This postcard was sent by Claus

Amer Fort (or Amber Fort) is a fort located in AmerRajasthanIndia.
Amer Fort is known for its artistic Hindu style elements. With its large ramparts and series of gates and cobbled paths, the fort overlooks Maota Lake, which is the main source of water for the Amer Palace. - in: wikipedia

The 6  forts (in red what I have):

  • Chittorgarh Fort
  • Kumbhalgarh Fort
  • Ranthambore Fort
  • Gagron Fort
  • Amber Fort
  • Jaisalmer Fort